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Homeowner Resources

The Internet and print media offer homeowners and incredible array of information sources on virtually any aspect of home maintenance, historic renovation, period home restoration and more. I’ve chosen those sites and publications that I feel offer the most accurate and easy to access information. 

Period Homes www.period-homes.com

Preservation Briefs
The standard and highly informative guidelines used for restoring and preserving historic buildings and their components.  The National Park Service Briefs are available in print and on-line.
www.nps.gov/history/hps/tps/publications.htm

Fine Homebuilding Magazine
The best publication dealing with quality new construction and remodeling. 
www.finehomebuilding.com/pages/

Old House Journal
A classic renovation source and old house manual. www.oldhousejournal.com  

The Landmark Society of Western New York
Local helping hands for old homeowners for decades.  The long out of print house manual “Rehab Rochester” by Steve Jordan is on-line at this site. www.landmarksociety.org

This Old House
Ever want to know more about the projects you've watched on this PBS classic? Their website offers information on construction techniques and products featured on the show. www.thisoldhouse.com

Historic House Parts
Rochester’s original used and salvage house store on South Ave. www.historichouseparts.com

Books

These may be out of print.  If so, check on www.abebooks.com or www.bookfinder.com for copies.

Reader’s Digest “How To” books: The Reader’s Digest Book of Skills and Tools; New Fix-it-Yourself Manual; The Family Handyman: How a House Works.  Not preservation oriented, but helpful nevertheless.

A Pattern Language, by Christopher Alexander, Oxford University Press, 1977. In my opinion, THE most important book on design. If you can buy only one book, buy this one before you invest in a house.

Designing a Place Called Home, by James Wentling, Chapman & Hall, 1995. What's wrong with tract housing and how to make it right.

A Field Guide to American Houses, by Virginia & Lee McAlester, Alfred Knopf, 1985. No, not all two story traditional homes are "colonials".

Jerry Ludwig
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